ViewNEW PHILADELPHIA CITY SCHOOLS
Address: 343 Ray Ave NW | New Philadelphia, OH 44663
Phone: 330-364-0644
Fax: 330-364-0633
Principal's Message
Principal's Message
My name is Eric Jurkovic, principal of New Philadelphia High School, and I would like to welcome you to NPHS and thank you for exploring our web pages. Below is a brief history of NPHS comprised by former librarian, Connie Evans:

Today, New Philadelphia High School, located on Ray Avenue, NW, remains a strong presence for townspeople with its focus on student and community activities. The present structure which blends old and new construction remains as a city beacon which has produced some of the most memorable people and events in city history. In December 1913, the laying of the cornerstone for NPHS was celebrated and included a box with documents and school memorabilia. This first high school yearbook, The Corona was published and remains as document to the history and importance of high school clubs and athletics in the life of a NPHS student. Led by Principal G. A. Davis, the staff consisted of two mathematics teachers and six teachers for Science, English, Latin, German, Music and Commercial classes. NPHS enrollment increased steadily and in 1916 the first hot lunches were served to students. By 1918 the commercial business classes had enrolled 200 students and included job placement services for graduates. With the new building, the school board required that school events be held at the school and that school dances were forbidden. The high school orchestra was permitted to play music for student dancing for no longer than one hour after board action in 1920. In the 1920 Delphian the orchestra dedicated the song, “You Cannot Shake that Shimmy Here” to the board of education. NPHS students could also shimmy on the basketball court. In 1923 the NPHS basketball team was undefeated and would begin a long tradition of NPHS sports teams in the spotlight.

From 1929 to 1940 the country as well as NPCS residents struggled to meet their financial needs. NPCS used a variety of tactics to keep the school doors open to the public without charge. In 1933, Superintendent Franklin P. Geiger accepted a salary reduction of $725 from $5000 to $4275 and teachers were hired on a limited basis to meet the budget. Although these were tough financial times, NPHS programs still remained strong and competitive. The 1940 boys’ basketball team was the undefeated state basketball champions and today remains a strong example of school spirit and leadership during tough times.

When the U.S. entered into World War II, male and female teachers who enlisted created a teacher shortage; therefore, the board now permitted married females to be hired on a temporary basis. New courses added to the high school curriculum included pre-flight aeronautics, emergency mathematics, physical fitness and girls’ industrial arts. Woodrow “Woody” Hayes would leave his head football coaching duties at NPHS and enlist in the army. In 1943, the first circulating library was started in rooms 212-214 at Welty Middle School to meet new state requirements.

Athletics also played a key role in the history of NPHS with Quaker Stadium being named in 1952. Building improvements continued with updated offices and equipment. From 1955 through 1964 the school district continued to add to the high school structure. A school gymnasium and vocational department were added as the school curriculum evolved to allow for classes that would prepare students to enter the workforce after the war.

The 60s saw a definite trend towards “new” additions at NPHS. Color pictures were added to the yearbook in 1962 and 1966 NPHS band director Robert Bianco was congratulated for a combined band performance with Dover band at the Dover-NP football game.

During the 70s and 80s, NPHS continued to develop and promote student and community activities and become a centralized focus for students and community members with an emphasis on academics and extracurricular activities. In 1990, a devastating fire at the HS forced the administrators, staff, students, parents and community members to adopt a changed pattern of school attendance. With classes held at Kent State Tuscarawas, Buckeye Vocational School, area churches, and modular classrooms, new renovations began on a facility that required extensive repair and smoke removal. The repairs would take almost three years to complete and students would return to the building as it is at the present time. With new portions for home economics, science and social studies classes, a lecture hall and new library media center, the current NPHS structure remains as a testimony of old and new, past and present. Today, as the largest public high school in Tuscarawas county, NPHS continues to promote its core values of responsibility, respect, commitment, achievement, excellence, accountability, and honesty. With over 950 students and a staff of 62, NPHS continues to be a premier public high school in providing 21st century learning skills for students.


We strive in “continuing the tradition of achievement, commitment, and excellence” for all students who pass through the doors.
 
 
Special thanks to Jeanne Grossenbacher’s, A History of Public Education on Our Town of New Philadelphia, Ohio and Fred Miller.

Connie Evans
21 Sept. 2010

6/26/2013
New Philadelphia High School
343 Ray Ave NW
New Philadelphia, OH 44663
  P: 330-364-0644
  F: 330-364-0633
   Map & Directions
© 2018. All Rights Reserved.